"Lion and Monkey"

Dublin Core

Title

"Lion and Monkey"

Subject

Animal sculpture--20th century.
Apes in art
Bronze sculpture, American--20th century.
Fredericks, Marshall M., 1908-1998

Description

Fredericks sculpted The Lion and Monkey in 1957. He soon changed the sculpture to The Lion and Mouse, thinking it would be easier for children to sit or slide on the lion’s knee.

The hand of the artist is clearly visible in the workmanship of this model, including Fredericks’ fingerprints which can be seen on the sculpture. The treatment of the lion’s mane, a series of pressed on spheres of clay, gives him a more natural unkempt look rather than the ornate regal curls he would acquire in The Lion and Mouse.

The Lion and Monkey does not remind us of Aesop’s (c. 620 - c. 560 B.C.E.) fable The Lion and Mouse, but rather tells a different story. The monkey is relaxed and at ease with his back arched and his tail resting on the lion’s leg; he might even be contemplating a nap. The lion too is relaxed, and lying on his back in a pose of submission. There is no danger here, only a glimpse at a moment of serenity, balance and harmony.

Source

Marshall M. Fredericks Papers
Series V, Box 15 Folder 33

Date

n.d.

Rights

Use of this image requires permission from the Marshall M. Fredericks Archives.

Relation

V-15-33

Format

image/jpeg

Type

Image

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Black and white print

Physical Dimensions

8" x 10"

Files

Lion and Monkey.jpg

Citation

“"Lion and Monkey",” Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, accessed May 30, 2024, https://omeka.svsu.edu/items/show/2345.