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Sketches for "Victory Eagle (American Eagle)" medallion for Veterans Memorial Building

Ink on tracing paper
13" x 9"

The Victory Eagle on the facade of the Veterans Memorial Building in Detroit is 30 feet high and projects 4½ feet from the wall in high relief. Seven free-standing pylons were originally placed in front of the building along the walkway leading to the entrance. Twenty feet high and carved with incised relief, they…

Sketches for "Victory Eagle (American Eagle)" medallion for Veterans Memorial Building

Graphite and ink on tracing paper
14" x 9.25"

The Victory Eagle on the facade of the Veterans Memorial Building in Detroit is 30 feet high and projects 4½ feet from the wall in high relief. Seven free-standing pylons were originally placed in front of the building along the walkway leading to the entrance. Twenty feet high and carved with…

American Eagle, UAW Eagle, Relief, [Plaster]

Plaster relief of Veterans Memorial Building Eagle. There are a lot of pencil marks on this. All around the eagle is pencil markings and there are words at the top. The yellowish discoloring is from shellac used to seal the plaster.

Victory Eagle (American Eagle), UAW Eagle [Plaster]

Victory Eagle (American Eagle), 1950
Plaster Original

The Victory Eagle on the facade of the Veterans Memorial Building in Detroit is 30 feet high and projects 4½ feet from the wall in high relief. Seven free-standing pylons were originally placed in front of the building along the walkway leading to the entrance. Twenty feet high and carved…

Plaster Victory Eagle (American Eagle) in the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

View of the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum during its installation in 1988

Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Two plaster models of pylons from the Veterans Memorial Building in Detroit are installed in the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

View of "Night" and various reliefs in the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum during installation

Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

View of reliefs installed in the Marshall M. Fredericks Museum

Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

View of Veterans Memorial Building and pylons - 1993

The Victory Eagle on the facade of the Veterans Memorial Building in Detroit is 30 feet high and projects 4½ feet from the wall in high relief. Seven free-standing pylons were originally placed in front of the building along the walkway leading to the entrance. Twenty feet high and carved with incised relief, they depict scenes from the military…