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Sketches of "Victory Eagle (American Eagle)"

Colored pencil and graphite on tracing paper
18.25" x 12"

Fredericks stylized Victory Eagle in a very geometric and angular way for the exterior of the Federal Reserve Bank in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Although abstracted, the Victory Eagle appears to be landing on the surface of the pedestal. Moreover, it is situated above the eye-level of the…

American Eagle, Victory Eagle, Wing Molds, [Plaster and Rubber]

American Eagle plaster with rubber inner wing mold. Written on mold is "marshall wings". Molds are held together with wire.

American Eagle, Victory Eagle, Body Mold, [Plaster and Rubber]

Plaster and rubber mold in 4 pieces for body portion of eagle. Mold is held together with rope.

Pedestal for Eagle, [Wood]

Wood triangular shaped pedestal base four holes drilled on top. Wood painted white.

American Eagle, Victory Eagle [Plaster]

Plaster body and wings of the full-scale American Eagle mounted to a wood base. Written on the plaster are instructions for where the "right wing" and "left wing" are to be placed.

American Eagle, Victory Eagle [Bronze]

Victory Eagle (American Eagle), 1972
Bronze, cast 1988

Gift of Frank N. and Lucille Anderson
1991.036

Cast in 1972, The American Eagle, also known as the Victory Eagle, is installed on the Federal Reserve Bank in Cincinnati, Ohio. It is stylized in a very geometric and angular way. This is especially evident when compared to the…

View of the Royal Oak studio with "Black Elk: Homage to the Great Spirit," "Victory Eagle" (American Eagle) and "Henry Ford"

Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.

Sculptor Marshall Fredericks surrounded by models of his work in his Royal Oak studio

Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.

Sculptor Marshall Fredericks in his Royal Oak studio

Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.