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Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter P. Dyvig, his wife Karen and Marshall Fredericks pose together in the Royal Oak studio

Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter P. Dyvig, his wife Karen and Marshall Fredericks pose together in the Royal Oak studio.tif
Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.

Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter P. Dyvig, his wife Karen and Marshall Fredericks in the Royal Oak studio

Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter P. Dyvig, his wife Karen and Marshall Fredericks in the Royal Oak studio.tif
Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.

Peter P. Dyvig, Danish Ambassador to the U.S., his wife Karen and Marshall Fredericks in Fredericks' Royal Oak, studio

Marshall Fredericks and an assistant working on the plaster model of an unidentified medal.tif
Located on the northwest corner of Normandy and Woodward Avenue in Royal Oak, Michigan, the building served as Fredericks' studio for over 50 years.

Danish Ambassador Peter Dyvig, Michael Panhorst, and Marshall Fredericks in the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Amabassador Dyvig, Michael Panhorst and Marshall Fredericks at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Item #4221.jpg
Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter Dyvig examines the "Flying Wild Geese Medallion" he received while visiting the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Danish Ambassador to the U.S. Peter Dyvig displays the "Flying Wild Geese Medallion" for all to see at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Ambassador Dyvig receives the "Flying Wild Geese Medallion" from Marshall Fredericks at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Marshall Federicks and Ambassador Dyvig shake hands at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…

Marshall Fredericks presents Ambassador Dyvig with the "Flying Wild Geese Medallion" at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

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Mrs. Dorothy (Honey) Arbury studied with Fredericks when she attended Kingswood School at the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, in the 1930s. She met him through her uncle, Alden B. Dow, a prominent architect in Midland, Michigan, with whom Fredericks worked on architectural sculpture projects. In 1963, Mrs. Arbury was…